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Wardan Nara Bidi, Rottnest Island

  • Half day
  • 10 km
    • Bush Walk Grade 4

Explore the beauty of Salmon Bay and then cross over land to explore the WWII guns and tunnels.  Climb to the highest point on the Island, the top of Wadjemup Lighthouse, and then continue on west to world class surf break Strickland Bay!

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Trail Start

Get directions

The Wardan Nara Bidi can be walked east to west, or vice versa. Starting at Porpoise Bay bus stop or at Narrow Neck bus stop.

Trail End

Get directions

The Wardan Nara Bidi can be walked east to west, or vice versa. Starting at Porpoise Bay bus stop or at Narrow Neck bus stop

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Wardan Nara Bidi begins with a gradual climb up the hillside behind Parker Point. The slight increase in energy exertion is well worth it, as the views from the top are spectacular. There is a strategically placed bench at this spot to allow you to catch your breath and take in the incredible 180° views along the south coast of the Island. Continue on and explore Parker Point and Little Salmon Bay. Both of these bays are protected and prove very popular snorkelling spots. Stroll along Salmon bay, drinking in the sprawling turquoise waters. Then use the trail to cross over land to Oliver Hill!

The military history of Rottnest is marvellous. Experience newly restored World War II guns and dare to venture down in to the tunnels. The trail links Oliver Hill to  Wadjemup Lighthouse. The Rottnest Voluntary guides are on duty 365 days a year at both of these sites and for a small fee will take you on a fabulous informative tour. Dive in to the depths of the tunnels at Oliver Hill, and then climb to the top of the Wadjemup Lighthouse, which is the highest point on the Island. The 360° views from the top are worth the 155 step climb! Please note that these buildings can only be entered accompanied by a voluntary guide.

Heading on west, across the Rottnest borefields, you will find yourself at the world class surf break known as 'Strickos', on Strickland Bay. The trail then meanders through the Acacia scrub and pops out on to the craggy limestone shelves along Strickland Bay.

The final delight along this trail is the impressive Mammong sculpture, designed and created by Aboriginal artist Peter Farmer in 2016. The flashes of the flukes in the sunlight are a marvel.

Reaching Narrow Neck you can decide to continue your journey west, or to explore the north coast on the Karlinyah Bidi.

This trail is one of  5 sections which make up the 45 Wadjemup Bidi network and links with both Ngank Yira Bidi  and Gabbi Karniny Bidi.

Rottnest Island Visitor Centre

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  • Experience Perth

    Comprehensive information on the Perth region including destinations, things to see and do, accommodation and tours.


Be trail ready for Wardan Nara Bidi, Rottnest Island

Here is everything you need to know before visiting this trail.

Time / Duration

3-4hrs

Length

10km one way

What To Pack

Group B (Bushwalks and/or longer trails) required.

Trail Start

The Wardan Nara Bidi can be walked east to west, or vice versa. Starting at Porpoise Bay bus stop or at Narrow Neck bus stop.

Get directions

Trail End

The Wardan Nara Bidi can be walked east to west, or vice versa. Starting at Porpoise Bay bus stop or at Narrow Neck bus stop

Get directions

Bush Walk

Grade 4

Bushwalking experience recommended. Tracks may be long, rough and very steep. Directional signage may be limited.

Difficulty Notes

There is some light beach walking on this section and some gradual climbs.

Hazards & Warnings

Be aware there are poisonous snakes on Rottnest Island. The Dugite (Pseudonaja affinis) is a timid creature, but may bite if trod on or harrassed. Seek immediate medical assistance. Be aware of unstable rocky outcrops; always stick to the trail.

Facilities

Bike hire is available at Pedal and Flipper in the settlement. There are lots of bike racks situated specifically to allow you to hop off, lock up, and enjoy the walk trail.
Water available ONLY in Thomson Bay - ensure you fill up water bottles before leaving Thomson Bay. The Voluntary Guides sell bottled water at Oliver Hill and Wadjemup Lighthouse (cash only), but it may not be cold on a warm summer day!
Toilets available along the trail at Parker Point, Oliver Hill, Strickland Bay and Narrow Neck.
Bins and recycling points are situated at bus stops; please take all litter with you.
  • Lookouts
  • Picnic Area
  • Public Toilet
  • Sheltered Area
  • View Platform
  • Visitor Information Centre

Best time of year

All year round.

Fees

Visitor Fees are included in ferry travel. If you are travelling by private vessel you can pay online at www.rottnestisland.com or come in to the visitors centre at the Main Jetty on the Island.

Trail Access

Ferry - Departing Perth/Fremantle (www.rottnestexpress.com.au or www.sealinkrottnest.com.au) or Hillarys Boat Harbour (www.rottnestfastferries.com.au)

Prohibited Items

No pets. No bikes on trail (Bikes are encouraged on the Island, but no bikes on walk trails.) Why not park your bike at Porpoise Bay and walk the Wardan Nara Bidi, returning along the Bickley Bay trail from Oliver Hill and be re-united with your bicycle!
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